Asking yourself the quintessential question… Why MBA?

All of us have encountered this question and have developed responses that are both impressive and inventive. These responses reflect our perception of an MBA program which more often than naught is the result of certain stereotypes. To utilize something one must first perceive it. As much publicized, the MBA program has immense potential to be tailored to suit one’s personal requirements. But like any tailored fitting its usefulness is limited by one’s ability to perceive oneself in that outfit. There are several stereotypes attached to an MBA program. The numerically inclined want to pursue a career in finance or economics, the verbally inclined want to go for marketing or HR. Although these traits are necessary, they are by no means sufficient.  The most important quality of an MBA program is its versatility. It has the ability to be much more than just a degree.  Business, as we understand it, is based on certain principles spread across measurable disciplines. But a component of business cannot be compartmentalized. Any business activity is driven by five impulses (or “senses”) – finance, marketing, operations, HR and strategy. Finance tells you which option is most profitable among a list of alternatives. But who generates the list? Similarly marketing delivers value to your business. But how valuable do you want your business to be? Operations optimizes processes. But what level of optimality do you want? HR manages people. But which people do you need to manage? Strategy builds business intelligence? But how much intelligence is sufficient? The answers to these questions may not be available in text or speech. But these answers can be deciphered by application. The knowledge of these answers is the “sixth sense” of business. This knowledge (sixth sense) is both critical and elusive. It is this skill that one needs to acquire through an MBA program.

Regards,

Media Cell

Leave a Reply